How to Buy a Car Without Getting Taken for a Ride

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A customer and a car dealer usually have conflicting goals during the sales process.  The customer wants to pay as little as possible, whereas the car dealer wants to make as much profit as possible.  To maximize its profits, a car dealer frames the negotiations and sale in a way that is favorable to it.  Here are some ways to turn the tables on the car dealer:

1. Negotiate the Cash Price, Not the Monthly Payment.

The salesperson usually begins the negotiation by asking you how much you want or can afford to pay a month.  Negotiating this way, enables the salesperson to steer you into a sale that’s best for the car dealer.  Instead, do your homework before you go to the dealer.  You should know what the sticker price is before you look at a car.  Doing this will enable you to negotiate the cash price of a vehicle effectively.

2. Determine What Interest Rates You Are Eligible for Before You Go to the Dealer.

Part of the dealer’s strategy for increasing its profit is arranging the financing.  The dealer often acts as the initial lender and then sells the finance agreement for a profit to a traditional lender.  To increase its profit from the sale of the finance agreement, the dealer may need to charge you a higher interest rate than you could get if you obtained the financing on your own.  In addition, even if the dealer advertises a low interest rate, you might not qualify for that rate. 

3. Decline the Optional Products and Services.

After you’ve negotiated the sales price and the financing terms, the dealer will invariably try to sell a multitude of optional products and services: rustproofing, paint protection, fabric protection, VIN etching, oil change contracts, and extended service contracts.  Not only are these options unnecessary, they are also substantially marked up.  These are a significant source of profit for dealers.  If you really want these options, you can buy them elsewhere for less.  Moreover, extended warranties or service contracts are usually not worth the money. 

See https://lemonlawyer.wordpress.com/2008/06/03/extended-warranties-are-usually-not-worth-the-money-or-the-frustration/ for further information on extended warranties. See https://lemonlawyer.wordpress.com/2008/07/02/consumers-should-insist-on-factory-installed-accessories-and-components/ for information regarding dealer installed accessories.

www.Lemon-Law.to

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